Connecticut

  • February 28, 2024

    Kwok Trustee Seeks Second Judge's Help With Clawbacks

    Offering four high-profile bankruptcies as examples, the Chapter 11 trustee overseeing the $374 million case of Chinese exile Ho Wan Kwok has suggested that a second Connecticut bankruptcy judge could act as a mediator to help speed a deluge of 278 avoidance actions efficiently toward possible settlements.

  • February 28, 2024

    Conn. Mortgage Co. Says Partner Defected With Cash, Data

    A prospective business partner agreed to commit $100,000 to join a mortgage company and promised to bring along 15 employees, but once inside, they raided business assets for information and quickly left to start a competing venture, according to a lawsuit in Connecticut state court.

  • February 28, 2024

    Halkbank Immunity Gambit Doesn't Appear To Sway 2nd Circ.

    The Second Circuit did not appear keen Wednesday to dismiss criminal charges accusing Halkbank of laundering over $1 billion of Iran oil proceeds, after the U.S. Supreme Court directed arguments on the Turkish state-owned lender's assertion that common-law sovereign immunity protects it.

  • February 28, 2024

    TKO Reveals Ongoing Impact Of McMahon Issues In Filing

    WWE is not immune to the personal legal battles and controversies of disgraced founder Vince McMahon, who was recently accused of trafficking a former employee, according to a recent regulatory filing by parent company TKO.

  • February 28, 2024

    Conn. State Worker Wants Atty Fees After Noose Trial Win

    A Black employee of Connecticut's state energy and environmental regulator is asking a federal judge to award more than $200,000 in attorney fees after he prevailed in a lawsuit alleging that he was racially tormented and exposed to nooses in a hostile work environment.

  • February 28, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Asylum Bid Over Testimony Interruption

    The Second Circuit ruled that an immigration judge wrongly faulted an asylum-seeking Eritrean man for not testifying about being tied up and left outside after being interrogated by the Eritrean military, saying the judge didn't give the man a chance to.

  • February 28, 2024

    Plastic-Maker Says Insurers Must Cover Worker Death Suit

    Ohio-based manufacturer Encore Plastics took Travelers Property Casualty Co. of America and American Guarantee & Liability Insurance Co. to federal court, claiming both companies are violating their policies by refusing to defend or indemnify it in an underlying suit over one of its workers' death in an industrial accident.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Restaurant Rejects Revamped Wine-Tasting Death Suit

    Citing the statute of limitations and an alleged failure to plead a valid case, a venerable New Haven restaurant has asked a Connecticut state judge to reject an amended lawsuit accusing it of recklessly overserving alcohol at a "mandatory" employee wine tasting event and allegedly causing a worker's drunk driving death.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Mortgage Biz Rips 'Maximalist' CFPB Licensing Stance

    Shuttered East Hartford mortgage company 1st Alliance Lending LLC and its co-owners have argued a Connecticut federal court should throw out the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's claims that they deceived borrowers by letting unlicensed consultants create and manage their loans, asserting that the agency's "maximalist position" goes beyond the law.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ex-NESN Exec Gets 3½ Years In Fraud Scheme

    A former executive at the Massachusetts cable network that broadcasts Red Sox and Bruins games was sentenced Tuesday to 3½ years in prison for embezzling nearly $600,000 from his employer through an elaborate invoicing scheme, crimes a judge called both "deliberate" and "insidious" and the government called "brazen."

  • February 27, 2024

    Connecticut Atty's Fishy Email Prompts Trust Account Audit

    A Connecticut Superior Court judge has ordered an attorney to cooperate with an official audit of his Webster Bank lawyer trust account after he responded to an overdraft notice and a commensurate disciplinary inquiry with an email saying the issue wasn't a priority because he was on a fishing trip.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Agency Asks Judge To Rethink Tuition Refund Pause

    The Connecticut Office of Higher Education has asked a state judge to vacate a ruling that paused the agency's refund process for students affected by the abrupt shutdown of Stone Academy, arguing the judge shouldn't have exercised jurisdiction over the matter and that the ruling interferes with the agency's statutory authority to implement the program.

  • February 26, 2024

    Clement, Prelogar Odd Bedfellows In Social Media Showdown

    After GOP-led states targeted perceived stifling of conservative voices on social media, Monday's oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court could have featured predictable partisan fissures. But the case instead illustrated that legal ideology in the digital age is sometimes surprising.

  • February 26, 2024

    MetaBirkins NFT Maker Tells 2nd Circ. 'Artwork' Is Protected

    The creator of the MetaBirkins non-fungible token collection has told the Second Circuit that his use of the iconic Hermès bag's name and likeness was relevant to his artwork but said the New York court misapplied the test of whether it was protected speech when it found that the digital assets infringed on the fashion house's trademarks.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Social Media Speech Laws Pose 'Land Mines'

    The U.S. Supreme Court seemed skeptical Monday of the constitutionality of Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on viewpoint, but struggled with whether the still-developing records in the lawsuits challenging the regulations could support a meaningful ruling on platforms' First Amendment rights.

  • February 26, 2024

    Gartner, Hackett Settle Trade Secrets, Employee-Poaching Suit

    Consulting firm Gartner Inc. and its rival The Hackett Group Inc. have settled a trade secrets fight that saw each company accuse the other of unfair trade practices, according to a filing dismissing the case from Connecticut federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Lyft Can't Escape Claims Its Driver Failed To Protect Teenager

    A Connecticut federal judge won't let Lyft out of a suit alleging one of its drivers drove a 14-year-old out of state to a location where she was sexually abused, saying the girl's family is allowed to amend its complaint.

  • February 26, 2024

    Conn. Client Pans Firm's Late Reveal Of Prior Email Mess

    An optometrist who claims a fraudster infiltrated her lawyer's email system and tricked her into wiring $90,586 to an incorrect account has challenged the firm's "very late post-trial disclosure" of five pages of emails about an alleged earlier incident, saying the messages are relevant to her own case.

  • February 26, 2024

    Conn. Homeowners Say Toll Bros. Botched Senior Community

    A planned community hit construction firm Toll Brothers with a breach of contract suit in Connecticut state court, alleging 67 townhomes, six apartment buildings and a clubhouse were built or improved with dozens of major defects the builder failed to fix.

  • February 24, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Social Media Laws & Bump Stocks

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments related to three big-ticket cases this week in a pair of First Amendment challenges to Florida and Texas laws prohibiting social media platforms from removing content or users based on their viewpoints and a dispute over the federal government's authority to ban bump stocks.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Justices OK $2.9M Cut To Power Co.'s Cost Recovery

    Connecticut's highest court on Friday held that state energy regulators properly trimmed a power company's annual cost recovery bid by more than $2.86 million, agreeing with a lower court that it was not arbitrary or capricious to decline to pass the expense to customers.

  • February 23, 2024

    US Gun Cos. Seek Time For Justices' Input On Mexico's Suit

    Gunmakers facing a recently revived lawsuit looking to hold them liable for firearms trafficking and cartel violence in Mexico on Friday asked a Boston federal judge to stand down and halt proceedings so the U.S. Supreme Court can have a chance to review the case.

  • February 23, 2024

    Judge Nixes McCarter & English Client's Relief Bid In Fee Row

    A Connecticut federal judge rejected a bid for Second Circuit relief from a supplement company that lost a billing battle with its former lawyers at McCarter & English LLP, concluding Friday that the Connecticut Supreme Court should offer guidance on whether state law allows punitive damages awards in contract disputes.

  • February 23, 2024

    Conn. Attys Agree To Arbitrate Their Twin Conversion Claims

    Two Connecticut attorneys who sued each other over defamation, secretly accepting home improvement projects as payment for legal services and neglecting business responsibilities at a joint firm they agreed to dissolve in 2021, have dropped their dueling state court claims.

  • February 23, 2024

    Red Sox Network Exec Says 18 Mos. Enough For Billing Fraud

    A former vice president with the network that broadcasts Boston Red Sox and Boston Bruins games argued Thursday that he should spend no more than 18 months in federal prison after a jury convicted him of bilking his former employer through a phony invoice scheme.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Considerations For Disclosing AI Use In SEC Filings

    Author Photo

    Recent remarks from U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler should be heard as a clarion call for public companies to disclose artificial intelligence use, with four takeaways on what companies should disclose, says Richard Hong at Morrison Cohen.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

    Author Photo

    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

    Author Photo

    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

    Author Photo

    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • 4 Steps To Navigating Employee Dementia With Care

    Author Photo

    A recent Connecticut suit brought by an employee terminated after her managers could not reasonably accommodate her Alzheimer's-related dementia should prompt employers to plan how they can compassionately address older employees whose cognitive impairments affect their job performance, while also protecting the company from potential disability and age discrimination claims, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • Navigating New Regulations In Healthcare And Other M&A

    Author Photo

    While notice requirements recently enacted in several states are focused on the healthcare industry for now, this trend could extend to other industries as these requirements are designed to allow regulators to be a step ahead and learn more about a transaction long before it occurs, say Kathleen Premo and Ashley Creech at Epstein Becker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!