Business of Law

  • April 30, 2024

    6th Circ. Nominee Denies Ethics Accusations Again

    A nominee for the Sixth Circuit provided more detail to bolster his denial of claims of ethical misconduct during his time as a prosecutor, as outlined in a follow-up questionnaire.

  • April 30, 2024

    Special Master Rejects Fee Bid In NFL Concussion Case

    Goldberg Persky & White PC should not receive a cut of legal fees for its unsuccessful efforts to receive a settlement that another law firm later secured for a former National Football League player related to concussion-linked disability claims, a special master has said.

  • April 30, 2024

    Buffalo Judge Won't Be Ejected For Brawl, Ethics Failures

    New York state's judicial ethics watchdog said Tuesday that a Buffalo judge should be censured but not removed following an investigation into a street fight with neighbors during which the judge shoved an officer and touted his ties to the mayor and police, among other ethical lapses.

  • April 30, 2024

    ABA Knocks Down 'Implausible' Data Breach Class Action

    The American Bar Association members suing the organization over a data breach have not identified any security measures the ABA failed to take, a New York federal judge said Tuesday when nixing what the organization called the members' "implausible" proposed class action.

  • April 30, 2024

    HSF's Paula Hodges On Arbitration's Future — And Her Own

    Herbert Smith Freehills LLP announced earlier this month that Paula Hodges KC will retire from the firm as of Wednesday, with Simon Chapman KC and Andrew Cannon taking her place as co-heads of the global arbitration practice. Law360 recently sat down with Hodges, who spent her entire 37-year career at Herbert Smith Freehills, to talk about what's next, how commercial arbitration has evolved over her career, and her experience as one of the first women in international arbitration.

  • April 30, 2024

    Atty Sanctioned Over Missed Depo During Solar Eclipse Trip

    A Florida lawyer whose client missed his own deposition while the attorney was solar eclipse viewing has been ordered to pay related attorney fees incurred by AAA as the business fights a gender discrimination lawsuit.

  • April 30, 2024

    New Florida Moms To Be Excused From Jury Duty

    Florida women who have recently given birth will soon be excused from jury duty, with Gov. Ron DeSantis signing a bipartisan bill into law last week.

  • April 30, 2024

    DC Bar Prosecutors Say Jeffrey Clark 'Betrayed His Oath'

    Attorney disciplinary authorities in Washington, D.C., have urged an ethics hearing committee to recommend disbarring former U.S. Department of Justice official Jeffrey Clark, saying he "betrayed his oath" to the Constitution by aiding former President Donald Trump's efforts to undermine the 2020 elections, and "is not fit to be a member of the District of Columbia Bar."

  • April 30, 2024

    Titan Of The Plaintiffs Bar: BLB&G's Jeroen Van Kwawegen

    Were it not for the University of Amsterdam's study abroad program, Netherlands-born Jeroen van Kwawegen might have never moved to the United States. And were it not for a long-distance relationship that got its start in the U.S., van Kwawegen might still be based across the Atlantic.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-DOJ Antitrust Atty Joins Kressin Meador As Name Partner

    A former U.S. Department of Justice official who most recently worked at Fried Frank Harris Shriver & Jacobson LLC has joined antitrust boutique Kressin Meador Powers LLC, formerly known as Kressin Meador LLC, as a name partner.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ethics Probes Take Mental Toll On Solo, Small Firm Attorneys

    Facing a disciplinary complaint can take a toll on any attorney’s mental health. But for solo practitioners and small firm lawyers, who typically juggle all aspects of their business from handling client matters to administrative tasks like managing trust accounts, it can threaten to upend their lives.

  • April 30, 2024

    Trump Held In Contempt For Trashing Witnesses In NY Trial

    A New York state judge on Tuesday found former President Donald Trump in contempt of court for repeatedly violating a gag order in his criminal hush money case by publicly attacking expected witnesses, including his former attorney Michael Cohen.

  • April 30, 2024

    Coverage Recap: Day 5 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from day five.

  • April 29, 2024

    Robinhood's Top Lawyer Saw Pay Slashed By 29% In 2023

    Dan Gallagher, the chief legal officer for online securities trading company Robinhood, earned $10.7 million in 2023, a nearly 30% decrease from the $15.1 million he came away with in 2022, according to a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

  • April 29, 2024

    'Hell No': Judge Rejects Ex-NSA Worker's Lighter Sentence Bid

    A Colorado federal judge on Monday sentenced a former National Security Agency employee to nearly 22 years in prison for trying to sell classified national security information to someone he believed to be a Russian agent, calling the conduct "as close to treasonous as you can get."

  • April 29, 2024

    Kirkland Adds 2nd Funds Group From Goodwin This Year

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP has hired a group of four attorneys specializing in investment funds from Goodwin Procter LLP, the firm said Monday, following its addition of five investment funds lawyers from the same firm in February.

  • April 29, 2024

    NJ Legal Groups Fight Ban On Out-Of-State Atty Referral Fees

    The New Jersey State Bar Association and other Garden State professional legal groups are looking to reverse guidance from a New Jersey Supreme Court ethics committee prohibiting the state's certified attorneys from paying referral fees to out-of-state lawyers.

  • April 29, 2024

    11th Circ. Should Nix Tax Court Judges' Shield, Widow Says

    The widow of a supermarket butcher told the Eleventh Circuit that the U.S. Tax Court not only wrongly upheld tax liabilities against her stemming from her husband's tax filings but also erroneously affirmed unconstitutional job protections for its judges. 

  • April 29, 2024

    Turkey Cos. Seek Swift Appeal Of Burford's Ability To Sue

    Some of the country's largest turkey producers have asked an Illinois federal court for permission to immediately appeal a March ruling that allows a Burford Capital investment unit to pursue price-fixing allegations against them, arguing the Seventh Circuit should weigh in on whether the investor is permitted to bring such a claim.

  • April 29, 2024

    Titan Of The Plaintiffs Bar: Robbins Geller's Spencer Burkholz

    Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP's Spencer A. Burkholz is quick to downplay his accomplishments litigating major securities cases during his lengthy career, saying effective teamwork has been the key to those successes.

  • April 29, 2024

    Immigration Firm BAL Lands 21 Attys From Seyfarth

    Immigration firm Berry Appleman & Leiden LLP is set to welcome about 90 legal professionals — including 21 attorneys — from Seyfarth Shaw LLP this summer and will open a new office in Atlanta as part of the expansion, the firm said Monday.

  • April 29, 2024

    The Best Therapy For Lawyers, According To Ex-Lawyers

    Attorneys-turned-therapists say no one understands the stresses of being a lawyer like another lawyer. They also say their clients sometimes struggle at first with treatment that prioritizes feelings, mindfulness and even body awareness over the intellectualizing and rationalizing that make them successful at their jobs.

  • April 29, 2024

    EEOC Guidance Addresses Telework, Shields LGBTQ Workers

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Monday unveiled the final version of its enforcement guidance on workplace harassment, updating the agency's advice to factor in developments such as the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark Bostock decision and the rise of remote work.

  • April 29, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Musk's Case Against SEC Gag Order

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday said it will not review the terms of a settlement Elon Musk entered into with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission six years ago, keeping intact a Second Circuit decision that upheld the terms of a deal that said the Tesla CEO must receive preauthorization before making certain social media posts about the car manufacturer.

  • April 26, 2024

    Law360 Reveals Titans Of The Plaintiffs Bar

    In the past year, plaintiffs have won settlements and judgments for millions and billions of dollars from companies such as Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs, Facebook and Fox News, with many high-profile cases finally wrapping up after years of fighting. Such cases — involving over-the-top compensation packages, chemical contamination, gender discrimination and data mining — were led by attorneys whose accomplishments earned them recognition as Law360's Titans of the Plaintiffs Bar for 2024.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Opinion

    Guardrails Needed Against Politically Motivated Atty Discipline

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    As illustrated by revelations about disbarred attorney Tom Girardi’s influence, there is a need to revamp attorney discipline to protect the public, but any reforms to misconduct rules must also consider how bar-directed disciplinary hearings are increasingly used as a political weapon, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Why Justices' SuperValu Ruling Wasn't Quite A 'Seismic Shift'

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    Notwithstanding an early victory lap by the relators' bar, the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in U.S. v. SuperValu Inc. was a win for both whistleblowers and sophisticated companies, but unfortunately left “subjective belief” to be interpreted by lower courts and future litigants, say attorneys at Baker Donelson.

  • Pitfalls Of Attorney AI Use In Brief Prep Has Judges On Alert

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    Some lawyers are attempting to leverage generative artificial intelligence as a brief drafting tool, which may serve to greatly reduce the burden of motion practice, but several recent cases show that generative AI is not perfect and blind reliance on this tool can be very risky, say Matthew Nigriny and John Gary Maynard at Hunton.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • How Calif. Arbitrators Can Navigate Discovery Landscape

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    Recent California state court decisions that created prehearing discovery subpoena constraints make clear the importance of considering the need for prehearing discovery when drafting arbitration clauses, or attempting to remedy the absence of such authority if both parties seek such discovery after an action commences, says Greg Derin at Signature Resolution.

  • Level Up Lawyers' Business Development With Gamification

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    With employee engagement at a 10-year low in the U.S., there are several gamification techniques marketing and business development teams at law firms can use to make generating new clients and matters more appealing to lawyers, says Heather McCullough at Society 54.

  • Mallory Ruling Leaves Personal Jurisdiction Deeply Unsettled

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    In Mallory v. Norfolk Southern Railway, a closely divided U.S. Supreme Court recently rolled back key aspects of its 2017 opinion in Daimler AG v. Bauman that limited personal jurisdiction, leaving as many questions for businesses as it answers, say John Cerreta and James Rotondo at Day Pitney.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

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