Public Policy

  • February 28, 2024

    FTC Not Backing Down In Kids' Privacy Arena, Chair Says

    The Federal Trade Commission is focused on using all its tools to crack down on social media platforms that are "manipulating" users' data and harming children, including by continuing to take aggressive enforcement action and exploring the possibility of crafting new regulations to curb online "commercial surveillance" practices, the agency's chair said Wednesday. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Ariz. AG Says RealPage, Landlords Use Algo To Fix Rent Prices

    Arizona's attorney general on Wednesday filed an antitrust suit in state court against RealPage and several landlords over an alleged conspiracy to illegally raise rents for hundreds of thousands of renters by using the software company's algorithms to quell competition.

  • February 28, 2024

    Sioux Phone Authority Keeps Calling For FCC Telecom Status

    The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Telephone Authority has once again asked the Federal Communications Commission to recognize it as an "eligible telecommunications carrier," saying several tribal groups, as well as the South Dakota Public Utilities Commission, support its bid for agency recognition.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Asks When Feds Will Consider Climate In Oil Leases

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday voiced frustration at the Bureau of Land Management's inability to account for the total impact of carbon emissions from six western oil and gas leases, but cautioned that previous circuit courts have upheld federal agencies' reluctance to block projects based on climate change predictions.

  • February 28, 2024

    SEC Taps Agency Vet To Lead Adviser, Fund Rulemaking Unit

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission announced Wednesday that an agency veteran currently serving as deputy director of the examinations division will be the new head of its investment management division, which oversees the regulation of investment advisers, mutual funds and certain private fund operators.

  • February 28, 2024

    'Lawyer Cat' Judge, Texas Attys Seek Seats On New Courts

    The state court judge behind 2021's viral "lawyer cat" video along with several prominent Houston attorneys have submitted bids for appointment to the Lone Star State's newest courts, according to records obtained by Law360. Here's a look at some of the attorneys who have thrown their names in the running for the new appointments.

  • February 28, 2024

    Marcum CPA Sues To Stop SEC's 'Unprecedented' In-House Case

    A certified public accountant and Marcum LLP engagement partner has sued the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in New York federal court, seeking to block its administrative case against him by arguing his constitutional rights are being violated by an "entirely unprecedented" enforcement action.

  • February 28, 2024

    Seminole Sports Gaming Compact Worth $4.4B, Report Says

    An economic research agency in Florida estimated in a recent report that a gaming compact between the state and the Seminole Tribe of Florida that is currently pending certiorari review by the U.S. Supreme Court will garner $4.4 billion in new revenues for the state over the next six years.

  • February 28, 2024

    Justices Lean On Both Sides In ATF Bump Stock Rule Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday considered whether bump stocks can be considered machine guns under an Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives rule banning the devices, knocking holes in opposing interpretations of the National Firearms Act's definition of a machine gun.

  • February 28, 2024

    Rochester Loses Telecom Fee Bench Trial Over Hearsay

    Verizon Communications and Crown Castle Fiber have won their fight with Rochester, New York, over how much the city can charge telecoms to do business after the New York federal judge overseeing the case declared the city's cost spreadsheet to be hearsay. 

  • February 28, 2024

    SEC Republicans Warn Against Changing 'Accredited' Definition

    Limiting who counts as an accredited investor could "devastate" local angel investor networks, a Republican member of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has warned, as the agency weighs enacting additional rules on private markets.

  • February 28, 2024

    Binance Founder Against More Travel Limits, Floats UAE Trip

    Binance founder Changpeng Zhao has told a Washington federal judge he opposes prosecutors' motion for further travel restrictions and suggested, without explicitly asking, that he be allowed to see his family in the United Arab Emirates. 

  • February 28, 2024

    Judges Tell Mich. To Get Moving On Flint Engineering Suit

    Michigan federal and state judges on Wednesday told the state to speed up its professional malpractice case against an engineering firm accused of prolonging the Flint water crisis, saying Michigan can't worry about whether it would look bad to go ahead before residents resolve their federal claims.

  • February 28, 2024

    Au Pair Agency Can't Arbitrate Wage Claims, Judge Says

    Au pair agency Cultural Care has waived any claimed right to pursue arbitration in a proposed collective wage complaint by extensively litigating the case for several years, including a trip to the First Circuit, a Massachusetts federal judge concluded Wednesday.

  • February 28, 2024

    US Mine Claims 'An Affront' To Nat'l Sovereignty, Mexico Says

    The government of Mexico on Wednesday called on a multinational panel to toss the United States' claims that the collective bargaining rights of workers at a mine in Zacatecas continue to be violated six years after a workers' strike ended.

  • February 28, 2024

    Energy Dept. To Give Tribes $25M For Clean Energy Tech

    The U.S. Department of Energy has said it is paying out $25 million in funds to Indigenous tribes for clean energy technology on tribal lands as part of an approximately $366 million Biden administration plan to support community-driven energy projects in rural areas.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trans Teens Tell High Court To Pass On Idaho's Stay Request

    Two transgender Idaho teens told the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday that the state did not establish "any of the criteria" required for the high court to let Idaho enforce a ban on gender-affirming care while a battle over such care plays out in the Ninth Circuit.

  • February 28, 2024

    Trump Kicked Off Ill. Ballot, But Ruling On Hold For Appeal

    A Cook County judge ruled Wednesday that former President Donald Trump must be removed from the ballot ahead of Illinois' March 19 primary election, siding with voters who argued he was constitutionally barred from again holding office but staying the effect of her decision pending an appeal to the state's highest court.

  • February 28, 2024

    Sen. McConnell Exiting GOP Post After Reshaping Judiciary

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who has had a vast impact on reshaping the federal judiciary, announced Wednesday that he will be stepping down from his leadership role after the November elections.

  • February 28, 2024

    GAO Says $267M Patent Deal Failed To Meet Requirements

    The U.S. Government Accountability Office sustained an intellectual property research firm's protest of a $267 million deal to help the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office review patent applications, saying the deal's winner didn't meet a clear small business subcontracting requirement.

  • February 28, 2024

    Elite Schools Get OK For $166M More Aid-Fixing Deals

    An Illinois federal judge handling student aid-fixing allegations against 17 top universities gave his initial blessing to another $166 million in settlements Wednesday, the day after he ordered three universities to produce documents that could show they handled certain students' admissions differently from others.

  • February 28, 2024

    FCC 'Amnesty' Sought For Rural Broadband Grant Defaults

    Broadband experts got together Wednesday to urge the Federal Communications Commission to offer "amnesty" for defaulting on FCC-funded rural network development projects, so that unserved areas can still receive similar grants being distributed by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

  • February 28, 2024

    6th Circ. Rules Copyright Law Is For 'Dull' Stuff, Too

    The top appeals court judge at the Sixth Circuit has issued a precedential opinion insisting that "all manner of works," even stuff that's boring and "run-of-the-mine," can be protected by copyright law, affirming a judgment that stuck a business with more than $1 million in damages and fees for copying the terms and conditions used by a car-dealer loyalty program.

  • February 28, 2024

    Carriers Seek More Time For SIM Card Anti-Fraud Measures

    A telecom carriers' group agreed with wireless companies who say the Federal Communications Commission needs to set aside more time for providers to comply with new rules to fight SIM card swapping fraud.

  • February 28, 2024

    Senate GOP Blocks Bill To Federally Protect IVF

    Senate Republicans blocked a unanimous consent vote on a bill to federally protect in vitro fertilization on Wednesday, a move that came after the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that frozen embryos count as children, with prominent GOP leaders lamenting the court's ruling.

Expert Analysis

  • Proposed Hydrogen Tax Credit Regs May Be Legally Flawed

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    While the recently proposed regulations for the new clean hydrogen production tax credit have been lauded by some in the environmental community, it is unclear whether they are sufficiently grounded in law, result from valid rulemaking processes, or accord with other administrative law principles, say Hunter Johnston and Steven Dixon at Steptoe.

  • No AI FRAUD Act Is A Significant Step For Right Of Publicity

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    The No Artificial Intelligence Fake Replicas and Unauthorized Duplications Act's proposed federal right of publicity protection, including post-mortem rights, represents a significant step toward harmonizing the landscape of right of publicity law, Rachel Hofstatter and Aaron Rosenthal at Honigman.

  • How Broker-Dealers Can Prepare For New Remote Work Rules

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    Securities regulators recently expanded broker-dealers' ability to permit flexible remote working arrangements through the introduction of residential supervisory locations, a welcome change that better allows broker-dealers to attract and retain talent, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Communication Is Key As CFPB Updates Appeals Process

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    Though a recently updated Consumer Financial Protection Bureau rule expands financial institutions' abilities to appeal supervisory decisions, creating strong relationships and open communication channels with CFPB examiners may help resolve disputes faster than the more cumbersome formal process, says Jason McElroy at Saul Ewing.

  • Considerations For Disclosing AI Use In SEC Filings

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    Recent remarks from U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler should be heard as a clarion call for public companies to disclose artificial intelligence use, with four takeaways on what companies should disclose, says Richard Hong at Morrison Cohen.

  • Unpacking The New Russia Sanctions And Export Controls

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    Although geographically broad new prohibitions the U.S., U.K. and EU issued last week are somewhat underwhelming in their efforts to target third-country facilitators of Russia sanctions evasion, companies with exposure to noncompliant jurisdictions should pay close attention to their potential impacts, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • After TikTok, Tiptoeing Toward Patent Transfer Alignment

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    Following the Fifth Circuit's TikTok decision, which aimed to standardize transfer analysis in patent cases, the Federal Circuit and Texas federal courts facing transfer requests have taken small steps to consider the practical realities of patent litigation, reinforcing the intensely factual focus of the analysis, says Charles Fowler at McKool Smith.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • What Recent Setbacks In Court Mean For Enviro Justice

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    Two courts in Louisiana last month limited the federal government's ability to require consideration of Civil Rights Act disparate impacts when evaluating state-issued permits — likely providing a framework for opposition to environmental justice initiatives in other states, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • New Hydrogen Regulations Show The Need For IP Protections

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    The introduction of hydrogen regulations, such as the IRS' proposed tax credit for clean hydrogen under the Inflation Reduction Act, are reshaping the competitive landscape, with intellectual property rights an area of increased emphasis, say Evan Glass and James De Vellis at Foley & Lardner.

  • Setting The Stage For High Court BofA Escrow Interest Case

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    Dori Bailey and Curtis Johnson at Bond Schoeneck examine relevant legislation and case law dating back 200 years ahead of oral arguments at the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday in Cantero v. Bank of America, the outcome of which will determine whether state laws governing mortgage escrow accounts can be enforced against national banks.

  • DC's Housing Tax Break Proposal: What's In It, What's Missing

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    Proposed Washington, D.C., rules implementing the Housing in Downtown Tax Abatement program — for commercial property owners who convert properties into residential housing — thoroughly explain the process for submitting an application, but do not provide sufficient detail regarding the actual dollar value of the abatements, says Daniel Miktus at Akerman.

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