Courts

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    Justices Limit SEC's Use Of In-House Courts

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday curtailed the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's use of its in-house court system, saying the accused have a right to a jury trial when financial penalties are on the table.

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    Justices Nix 3rd-Party Liability Releases In Purdue Ch. 11 Plan

    The U.S. Supreme Court shot down the validity of nonconsensual third-party releases in an opinion issued Thursday in the case of bankrupt drugmaker Purdue Pharma LP, potentially exposing the Sackler family members who own the company to personal liability for the company's role in the opioid crisis.

  • Menendez Pals 'Generous,' Jeweler Says In Joke-Filled Testimony

    A jeweler who helped Sen. Robert Menendez's wife sell gold bars that were supposedly bribes testified Wednesday the codefendants who gave Menendez the bars have always been generous, salting his testimony with so many droll comments that the New York federal judge — who initially bantered back — eventually gave a special instruction reinforcing that the trial is "very serious."

  • Justices Chide 5th Circ. In Biden Social Media Case

    The Fifth Circuit relied on "clearly erroneous" facts and an overgeneralized view of standing when it ordered the Biden administration to stop working with social media platforms to combat COVID-19 and election misinformation, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Wednesday as it threw out a challenge to the government's actions.

  • Supreme Court Bribery Ruling Limits Government's 'Arsenal'

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision Wednesday limiting the reach of a federal bribery law has removed a "novel" tool that prosecutors employed in a wide range of public corruption cases and could result in fewer prosecutions of state and local officials, experts say.

  • House GOP Gears Up For The End Of Chevron Deference

    A new memo outlines how House Republicans are gearing up for the U.S. Supreme Court to potentially overturn the decades-old precedent that courts defer to agencies' interpretations of ambiguous statutes, as an opportunity to roll back the Biden administration's policies and reclaim Congress' power.

  • 5 Indicted In 'Feeding Our Future' Jury Bribery Scheme

    Five people have been indicted in Minnesota for trying to bribe a juror with a Hallmark gift bag containing $120,000 in cash in a failed attempt to influence the first trial of the sprawling "Feeding Our Future" $250 million pandemic fraud case, which recently ended with five convictions and two acquittals.

  • House GOP Mulls Little-Used Inherent Contempt For Garland

    A group of House Republicans are giving Attorney General Merrick Garland until Friday morning to comply with their demands for the audio recordings of President Joe Biden and his ghostwriter speaking with special counsel Robert Hur during his investigation into Biden's handling of classified documents before they move forward with a vote to hold him in inherent contempt of Congress.

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    High Court 'Inadvertently' Posts Order Punting Abortion Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court mistakenly released a draft order Wednesday that would allow emergency abortions in Idaho, with a majority saying the court was wrong to consider a state challenge at this time.

  • Justices Say Bribery Law Doesn't Criminalize Gratuities

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday narrowed the scope of a federal bribery law frequently used in corruption cases against local officials, in a 6-3 ruling in favor of a former Indiana mayor who argued the law only criminalizes quid pro quo bribery and not rewards given after an official act.

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    High Court Axes Challenge To Biden Admin's Social Media Work

    The U.S. Supreme Court wiped out a Fifth Circuit order prohibiting the Biden administration and several federal agencies from working with social media platforms to combat the spread of misinformation Wednesday, finding the states and individuals challenging the collaboration don't have standing to sue.

  • After Rahimi Win, Feds Set Sights On Felon Gun Ban

    In a bid to capitalize on last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling upholding a federal law that prohibits domestic abusers from possessing firearms, the U.S. solicitor general has called on the justices to next tackle a slew of constitutional challenges to the separate, sweeping ban on people convicted of felonies owning guns.

  • Trump Atty Argues Feds Lied To Get Mar-A-Lago Warrant

    An attorney representing Donald Trump in his criminal case over retaining classified documents after leaving the White House urged a Florida federal judge Tuesday to toss evidence seized during the raid on Mar-a-Lago, arguing the government put false information on the warrant application to search the former president's estate.

  • Plaintiffs Firms Appealing $2.1B Fee Order In Opioid Case

    Motley Rice LLC, Weisman Kennedy & Berris Co. LPA, Stranch Jennings & Garvey PLLC, Crueger Dickinson LLP, Goldstein & Russell PC, Kelley & Ferraro LLP, Spangenberg Shibley & Liber LLP and Meyers & Flowers LLC are appealing $2.13 billion in attorney fees stemming from opioid settlements awarded earlier this month.

  • Gov't Asks Ala. Fed. Court To Stay Gender Care Case

    The Biden administration has asked an Alabama federal court to stay a suit challenging a state law criminalizing gender-affirming care for transgender youth, which has drawn attention because of judge-shopping allegations leveled against plaintiff's counsel, as the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a separate but potentially precedential suit.

  • Man Posed As Atty To Scam Clients For Fees, Feds Say

    A Long Island man has been charged with posing as an attorney after he represented federal criminal defendants to fraudulently collect fees from them and their family members.

  • 2nd Circ. Affirms 5-Year Sentence For Impostor Immigration Atty

    A Connecticut woman sentenced to five years in federal prison for stealing money from vulnerable victims by pretending to be an immigration attorney can't undo her plea deal or lessen the roughly $368,000 she was ordered to pay in restitution, the Second Circuit has ruled.

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    Ga. Supreme Court Removes Arrested Judge From Bench

    The Georgia Supreme Court on Tuesday removed Douglas County Probate Court Judge Christina Peterson from office for violations of the state's code of judicial conduct, including jailing a woman seeking to amend her marriage record, after Peterson was arrested outside an Atlanta nightclub last week on unrelated charges.

  • House GOP Looks To Hold Biden Ghostwriter In Contempt

    The House Judiciary Committee will consider a resolution on Thursday on whether to hold President Biden's ghostwriter Mark Zwonitzer in contempt for refusing to turn over materials related to special counsel Robert Hur's investigation of the president's handling of classified documents.

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    Approach The Bench: Judge Nazarian Touts Mentorship

    Judge Douglas Nazarian of the Appellate Court of Maryland has given a lot of thought to clerkships since he took the bench more than 11 years ago.

  • DC Court Of Appeals Suspends Hunter Biden's Law License

    The D.C. Court of Appeals on Tuesday suspended Hunter Biden's license to practice law in the district because of his recent conviction on federal gun charges.

  • House Republicans Look To Cut Justice Department Funding

    House Republicans are looking to slash funding for the U.S. Department of Justice for fiscal 2025, a move that comes as Republicans have been attacking the department for what they deem unfair prosecutions of former President Donald Trump.

  • NY Judge Partially Lifts Trump Gag Order Ahead Of Sentence

    The Manhattan judge overseeing former President Donald Trump's hush-money case on Tuesday vacated key parts of a gag order intended to shield jurors and witnesses from his verbal attacks, although an order protecting the jurors' identities remains in place.

  • Menendez Was 'Weird' While Planning Egypt Trip, Jury Hears

    A New York federal jury weighing charges that U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez took bribes for official acts related to Egypt heard Monday from a congressional staffer that the senator acted "weird" while planning an official trip there and was "making up lies."

  • Willis' Plan To Prejudice Defendants Requires DQ, Trump Says

    Former President Donald Trump told the Georgia Court of Appeals on Monday that a trial court judge inaccurately applied the legal standard for forensic misconduct when he ruled that Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis could continue her prosecution of him and his co-defendants in the Georgia presidential election interference case.

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