Courts

  • Split 10th Circ. Spikes $17.3M Atty Fee Over Class Notice

    A split Tenth Circuit panel has vacated for a second time a $17.3 million attorney fee award for reaching a $52 million class action settlement over gas well royalty payments, with the majority writing that the lower court erred by not requiring a new class notice regarding the revised fee bid.

  • NJ Gov. Backs Letting Ex-Incarcerated Sit On Juries

    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Wednesday that his administration is supporting efforts to restore the right to people who were previously incarcerated to serve on juries, according to an announcement by the governor's office.

  • Coverage Recap: Day 6 Of Trump's NY Hush Money Trial

    Law360 reporters are providing live updates from the Manhattan criminal courthouse as Donald Trump goes on trial for allegedly falsifying business records related to hush money payments ahead of the 2016 election. Here's a recap from day six.

  • Rules Against Judge Shopping Move Forward At Fed Agency

    Federal appellate courts should review most government agency actions, and cases involving those actions that wind up in district courts should be subject to district-wide assignment to avoid judge shopping, according to recommendations approved Thursday by a committee of the federal agency charged with improving government rulemaking.

  • 4th Circ. Finds Judge Appointment Legit In Black Lung Case

    The Fourth Circuit ruled that an administrative law judge who presided over a black lung benefits case was properly reappointed by the U.S. Department of Labor, rejecting Dominion Coal Corp.'s contention that his seating violated the Constitution's appointments clause.

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    If High Court Upends Jan. 6 Conviction, What Happens Next?

    If the U.S. Supreme Court decides prosecutors overstepped by charging a rioter who stormed the Capitol with obstruction, the results will likely be mixed for hundreds of other defendants charged with the same crime, particularly those who have been convicted. That post-appeal uncertainty is nothing new, defense attorneys say.

  • 11th Circ. 'Emphatically' Upholds JCPenney's Sanctions Win

    The Eleventh Circuit has affirmed a $63,000 sanction against an Alabama shopping mall amid its lease dispute with JCPenney, finding that the mall acted in bad faith by not notifying the court of a lack of diversity jurisdiction, eventually sinking the case — only after JCPenney won partial summary judgment and a later mediation failed.

  • Feds Try To Bar Psychiatrist's Testimony From Menendez Trial

    Prosecutors have urged a Manhattan federal judge to bar U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez from introducing expert testimony at his upcoming bribery trial that he lived frugally and that his family's escape from an autocratic Cuban regime led him to develop a "fear of scarcity" and store large amounts of cash at home.

  • Feds Want Prison For Ex-Public Defender For Tax Fraud

    A former chief public defender in Minneapolis who in seeking leniency said he resigned in disgrace amid accusations that he failed to pay taxes for years on his private law firm should nonetheless spend eight months in prison after pleading guilty, prosecutors told a Minnesota federal court.

  • Schumer Reups Call For His Judge Shopping Bill

    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said Thursday that a suit filed in a controversial Texas court challenging a new firearms policy from the Biden administration underscores the need for his bill to restrict so-called "judge shopping."

  • 2nd Circ. To Weigh Court's Role In Bermuda Arbitration Row

    The Second Circuit will review Wednesday whether a New York federal court has the authority to remove an allegedly biased arbitrator in a Bermuda reinsurance arbitration, addressing the question of the federal court's limited role in international arbitration. Here, Law360 breaks down the case in advance of oral arguments.

  • Eastman Denied Stay Of Inactive Status To 'Safeguard' Public

    A State Bar Court of California judge on Wednesday denied a request from Donald Trump's onetime attorney John Eastman to delay placing him on inactive enrollment while he appeals the recommendation for his disbarment, saying he hasn't shown that "he no longer presents a threat to the public."

  • NY Lawmakers Call For Cop-Shoving Judge's Replacement

    New York State Senate Judiciary Committee members said that either the governor or senate should ensure Justice Mark Grisanti is ousted after an ethics panel opted not to remove the Buffalo judge who brawled with neighbors, shoved a cop and invoked his ties to power, among other unethical behavior.

  • Trump's Firm Can't Yet Withdraw After Atty-Client 'Breakdown'

    A Manhattan federal judge won't yet allow the attorneys representing Donald Trump's campaign to withdraw from a pregnancy retaliation suit brought by a former campaign aide over what they called an "irreparable breakdown in the attorney-client relationship," but on Wednesday set a conference to review the request behind closed doors.

  • Fed. Judge's Handcuffing Of Girl Was Misconduct, Panel Says

    The Judicial Council of the Ninth Circuit found Wednesday that a California federal judge engaged in judicial misconduct when he ordered that a crying 13-year-old girl in his courtroom be handcuffed, issuing a reprimand for his actions and ordering that the judge not be assigned new criminal cases for three years.

  • Median Patent Damages Awards Are Shrinking

    A New York accounting firm that provides damages experts for intellectual property cases has found in a new study that median damages awards in patent cases have declined over the last 15 years.

  • NJ Judge Kugler Retiring From Federal Bench At Month's End

    Senior U.S. District Judge Robert B. Kugler will step down from the New Jersey federal bench at the end of the month, concluding nearly 22 years there, Law360 has learned.

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    Ex-BCLP Atty From Pro Bono Nonprofit Named Atlanta Judge

    Atlanta Mayor Andre Dickens has named the co-director of the Safe and Stable Homes Project at Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation to serve as a judge in Georgia's largest municipal court.

  • Kramer Levin Boosts Appellate, Litigation Team With DOJ Atty

    Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel LLP has hired an appellate attorney from the U.S. Department of Justice, who joins the firm's litigation department as partner and will also serve as deputy chair of the firm's U.S. Supreme Court and appellate litigation practice, the firm announced Wednesday.

  • Kirkland Rips 'Tortured' Theory In Texas Judge Romance Suit

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP's inclusion in a Texas federal suit accusing it of conspiring with Jackson Walker LLP, a disgraced Texas bankruptcy judge and a former Jackson Walker partner who was his romantic partner to oust a CEO is based on "a tortured theory" and "flimsy facts," the firm declared.

  • In Trump Staredown With NY Judge, 'Somebody Has To Blink'

    Experts say Donald Trump will likely continue to ignore warnings from the court, and possibly his own attorneys, as his Manhattan hush money trial resumes Thursday with a fresh set of arguments over the presumptive Republican presidential nominee's out-of-court statements.

  • NC Lawmakers Seek $231M Boost For Retired Judges, Others

    North Carolina legislators offered Wednesday a $231 million proposal to raise the retirement benefits for judicial and other former state workers, framing it as a cost-of-living adjustment that would become effective July 1.

  • Federal Prosecutor Confirmed As Illinois District Judge

    The Senate voted 54-44 on Wednesday to confirm Assistant U.S. Attorney Georgia N. Alexakis as a U.S. District Court judge for the Northern District of Illinois.

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    Ex-FDIC Atty Gets 20-Year Sentence In Child Exploitation Case

    A former attorney with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. who admitted to participating in online groups aimed at sexually exploiting children has been sentenced to 20 years in prison.

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    Yoga Lawyer: A Way of Being In The (Legal) World

    More than a decade ago, a stressful job and a pile of physical ailments prompted attorney Cindy Pensoneau to take a deep dive into yoga. Today, she continues to work as both a lawyer and as a yoga teacher, illustrating the growing role that the ancient mind-body practice can play in improving attorney mental health.

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