Courts

  • 11th Circ. Sends OpenAI Fee Fight Back To District Court

    The Eleventh Circuit vacated a Georgia federal judge's decision not to dock OpenAI attorney fees for attempting to remove a Georgia radio host's defamation suit to federal court, saying the judge should have but did not adequately explain the reasons for the denial.

  • Prosecutors Call Indicted Exec's Misconduct Claims 'Flawed'

    Prosecutors have asked a California federal judge to reject a bid for sanctions by a former healthcare CEO indicted on novel insider trading charges, arguing that his claims related to a separate case are based on "flawed grounds."

  • Wash. Can Use New Elections Map Despite Partisan Criticism

    Washington state can implement a new, court-approved legislative district map aimed at resolving Hispanic voter dilution claims, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, rejecting a bid from three Republican Latino voters to pause the map's adoption while they challenge it for improperly favoring Democratic candidates.

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    Boston Bomber Case Offers Clues For Trump Jury Selection

    A recent ruling that may undo the Boston Marathon bomber's death sentence holds lessons for Donald Trump's upcoming trials, where attorneys will need to make prospective jurors comfortable enough to admit bias before they're picked — and potentially avoid years of appellate fights.

  • 100-Plus Groups Rally Behind Adeel Mangi For 3rd Circ.

    Over 100 federal and state advocacy groups sent a letter to senators on Tuesday urging them to support Adeel Mangi, nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge if confirmed, amid increasing opposition to him.

  • Man Gets 14 Months For Threatening To Kill Justice Roberts

    A Florida man who admitted to calling U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts' chambers and leaving a voicemail in which he twice threatened to kill the justice has been sentenced to 14 months in federal prison. 

  • Trump's Gag Order Expands Over 'Attacks' On Judge's Family

    Donald Trump has a constitutional right to respond to alleged political attacks, but he does not have a right to attack family members of the state judge overseeing his criminal case in New York, the judge ruled late Monday, expanding the former president's gag order in his hush money case.

  • Ga. Judicial Watchdog Wants Probate Judge Off The Bench

    A three-member panel of Georgia's Judicial Qualifications Commission has recommended a Douglas County probate judge be removed from the bench following accusations that she violated the state's Code of Judicial Conduct on social media and jailed a woman seeking to amend her marriage record.

  • Nat'l Security Info Ordered Sealed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland federal judge has ordered protocols to seal confidential State Department materials amid the government's criminal fraud case charging a Maryland lawyer with misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets.

  • 4E Can Give Recovered Jackson Walker Fees To Creditors

    The agent administering the confirmed plan of bankrupt hand-sanitizer maker 4E Brands Northamerica LLC received permission Monday from a Texas judge to modify that plan, allowing the agent to distribute fees clawed back from embattled law firm Jackson Walker LLP to the debtor's unsecured creditors.

  • Mich. Can't Get Immunity In Courthouse ADA Class Action

    Attorneys with disabilities and a disability rights advocate can proceed with a proposed class action aimed at forcing accessibility improvements at several Michigan courthouses and government buildings, a Michigan federal judge ruled Saturday, rejecting the state's argument that it was immune from the suit.  

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    Murdaugh Gets 40 Years For Financial Crimes In Fed. Court

    Alex Murdaugh, the disgraced former South Carolina lawyer serving a life sentence for murder, was hit with a concurrent 40-year prison term in federal court Monday after pleading guilty to stealing at least $9 million from clients.

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    Schumer Warns Texas Court Not To Continue Judge Shopping

    The U.S. Senate will consider legislation to curtail judge shopping after the Northern District of Texas' chief judge rejected calls for the district to take steps to end the "odious" practice on its own, the Senate leader said Monday.

  • NJ Courts Get Out Of Suit Alleging Ex-Judge Harassed Official

    The New Jersey Administrative Office of the Courts has gotten out of a lawsuit from a municipal court administrator alleging she was sexually harassed by a former municipal court judge, arguing that the woman was never an employee of the office.

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    Cooper University Health Names Ex-Judge As 1st Legal Chief

    Just over six months after retiring from the bench and joining Chiesa Shahinian & Giantomasi PC, a former New Jersey federal judge will become the first chief legal officer for South Jersey health system Cooper University Health Care.

  • James Fredricks and Mark Grundvig

    DOJ Antitrust Enforcement Vets Jump To Skadden, Foley

    Two veterans of the U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division have headed to private practice in Washington, D.C., with one joining Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP and another leaving the government for Foley & Lardner LLP, the firms said Monday.

  • Fla. Atty Can't Escape $300K COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A Florida attorney fell short in trying to nix her conviction for conspiracy to commit wire fraud when a Georgia federal court found the jury heard and saw a "plethora" of evidence to show she submitted fraudulent loan applications in an effort to obtain money meant to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Jailed Atty Pleads Not Guilty To Witness Tampering In Tax Case

    A Chicago-area lawyer facing more than a dozen criminal tax fraud charges pled not guilty Monday to superseding charges that he tried scripting a bookkeeper's anticipated testimony, but he'll have to wait to learn whether he'll remain jailed until his upcoming retrial.

  • Justices Won't Hear Atty's Bid To Conflict Out Entire Ill. Bench

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to take up the case of a lawyer suspended in Illinois who claimed the state's entire federal judiciary needed to recuse itself from his challenge to Illinois' attorney watchdog.

  • Petition Watch: Off-Label Ads, Retiree Discrimination & PPE

    A Utah attorney has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to determine whether allegedly retaliatory IRS summonses can be quashed, and two former pharmaceutical executives are challenging the constitutionality of their convictions for marketing the off-label use of a drug. Here, Law360 looks at recently filed petitions that you might've missed.

  • Manhattan DA Says Trump Violated Hush Money Gag Order

    Donald Trump may have already violated a New York state judge's gag order in the former president's hush money case by impugning the judge's daughter on social media, Manhattan prosecutors said, while Trump's attorneys say prosecutors are trying to improperly expand the order.

  • Northern Texas Judges Won't Adopt Judge-Shopping Rule

    Judges with the Northern District of Texas have opted not to make any changes to how cases are assigned, despite a recent letter from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer urging the district to implement an updated policy aiming to prevent litigants from judge shopping, the district's chief judge said Friday.

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    Las Vegas Sands' Global GC Sees Comp Top $12M In '23

    Las Vegas Sands' global general counsel, who earlier in his career clerked for Chief Justice John Roberts and then-U.S. Circuit Judge Brett Kavanaugh, earned more than $12 million in total compensation in 2023, a big jump from the roughly $2.6 million the previous year, according to a securities filing Friday.

  • Up Next After Bankman-Fried Sentencing: FTX Cooperators

    Now that FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried has been sentenced to 25 years in prison for an $11 billion fraud on the collapsed crypto exchange, it's time for the three top lieutenants who testified against him at trial to face their own judgments — and experts say the cooperators are well positioned to avoid jail time.

  • 2nd Circ. Revives Conn. Atty's Suit Over Gun Ban In Parks

    The Second Circuit has revived the lawsuit of a Connecticut attorney challenging the state's ban on firearms in state parks, finding that the state did not meet its burden to show it didn't intend to enforce the law.

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Expert Analysis

  • How BigLaw Can Mirror Small Firm Attorney Engagement Author Photo

    BigLaw has the unique opportunity to hit refresh post-pandemic and enhance attorney satisfaction by adopting practices that smaller firms naturally employ — including work assignment policies that can provide junior attorneys steady professional development, says Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Ditch The Annual Review To Boost Attorney Job Satisfaction Author Photo

    In order to attract and retain the rising millennial generation's star talent, law firms should break free of the annual review system and train lawyers of all seniority levels to solicit and share frequent and informal feedback, says Betsy Miller at Cohen Milstein.

  • How Attorneys Can Narrow LGBTQ Gap In The Judiciary Author Photo

    Lawyers can take several steps to redress the lack of adequate LGBTQ representation on the bench and its devastating impact on litigants and counsel in the community, says Janice Grubin, co-chair of the Judiciary Committee at the LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York.

  • Employers Must Heed Rising Attorney Stress And Alcohol Use Author Photo

    Krill Strategies’ Patrick Krill, who co-authored a new study that revealed alarming levels of stress, hazardous drinking and associated gender disparities among practicing attorneys, highlights how legal employers can confront the underlying risk factors as both warnings and opportunities in the post-COVID-19 era.

  • Lawyers Can Get Ready For Space Law To Take Flight Author Photo

    While international agreements for space law have remained relatively unchanged since their creation decades ago, the rapid pace of change in U.S. laws and policies is creating opportunities for both new and veteran lawyers looking to break into this exciting realm, in either the private sector or government, says Michael Dodge at the University of North Dakota.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: What Makes A Successful Summer Associate? Author Photo

    Navigating a few densely packed weeks at a law firm can be daunting for summer associates, but those who are prepared to seize opportunities and not afraid to ask questions will be set up for success, says Julie Crisp at Latham.

  • How To Successfully Market Your Summer Associate Program Author Photo

    Law firms can attract the right summer associate candidates and help students see what makes a program unique by using carefully crafted messaging and choosing the best ambassadors to deliver it, says Tamara McClatchey, director of career services at the University of Chicago Law School.

  • Opinion

    Judges Deserve Congress' Commitment To Their Safety Author Photo

    Following the tragic attack on U.S. District Judge Esther Salas' family last summer and amid rising threats against the judiciary, legislation protecting federal judges' personal information and enhancing security measures at courthouses is urgently needed, says U.S. District Judge Roslynn Mauskopf, director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Recalcitrant Attys Use Social Media? Author Photo

    Social media can be intimidating for reluctant lawyers but it can also be richly rewarding, as long as attorneys remember that professional accounts will always reflect on their firms and colleagues, and follow some best practices to avoid embarrassment, says Sean Marotta at Hogan Lovells.

  • Keys To Digitizing Inefficient Contract Management Processes Author Photo

    Neville Eisenberg and Mark Grayson at BCLP explain how they sped up contract execution for one client by replacing email with a centralized, digital tool for negotiations and review, and how the principles they adhered to can be helpful for other law firms looking to improve poorly managed contract management processes.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Firms Coach Associates Remotely? Author Photo

    Practicing law through virtual platforms will likely persist even after the pandemic, so law firms and senior lawyers should consider refurbishing their associate mentoring programs to facilitate personal connections, professionalism and effective training in a remote environment, says Carol Goodman at Herrick Feinstein.

  • How Law Firms Can Welcome And Celebrate Autistic Lawyers Author Photo

    As the U.S. observes Autism Acceptance Month, autistic attorney Haley Moss describes the societal barriers and stereotypes that keep neurodivergent lawyers from disclosing their disabilities, and how law firms can better accommodate and level the playing field for attorneys whose minds work outside of the prescribed norm.

  • Law Firm Tips For Evaluating AI And Machine Learning Tools Author Photo

    Many legal technology vendors now sell artificial intelligence and machine learning tools at a premium price tag, but law firms must take the time to properly evaluate them as not all offerings generate process efficiencies or even use the technologies advertised, says Steven Magnuson at Ballard Spahr.

  • A Call For Personal Accountability On Diversity And Inclusion Author Photo

    While chief legal officers are increasingly involved in creating corporate diversity, inclusion and anti-bigotry policies, all lawyers have a responsibility to be discrimination busters and bias interrupters regardless of the title they hold, says Veta T. Richardson at the Association of Corporate Counsel.

  • Learning How To Code Can Unleash New Potential In Lawyers Author Photo

    Every lawyer can begin incorporating aspects of software development in their day-to-day practice with little to no changes in their existing tools or workflow, and legal organizations that take steps to encourage this exploration of programming can transform into tech incubators, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

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