Courts

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    The Supreme Court's Week: By The Numbers

    The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in five cases this week, including a highly anticipated one over the fate of medication abortions, and another over when repeat offenders qualify to have their sentences enhanced. Here, Law360 Pulse takes a data-driven dive into the week that was at the U.S. Supreme Court.

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    'Rust' Movie Armorer Denied New Trial, Remains Jailed

    A New Mexico state judge on Friday rejected "Rust" armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed's emergency motion to be released from custody and given a new trial based on what her attorneys argued were erroneous jury instructions leading to her conviction over the on-set shooting death of a cinematographer.

  • Voir Dire: Law360 Pulse's Weekly Quiz

    The end of March marked another busy week for the legal industry as BigLaw made notable hires and shifted office locations. Test your legal news savvy here with Law360 Pulse’s weekly quiz.

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    Catching Up With Former NC Chief Justice Cheri Beasley

    It's been more than three years since former North Carolina Supreme Court Justice Cheri Beasley left the bench, accelerating her return to private practice and paving the way for a contested U.S. congressional campaign.

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    Ga. Bill Aims To Protect Judges Even As Security Gap Lingers

    Georgia is poised to join the federal government and a growing number of states in seeking to protect judges with a new legislative proposal that would restrict the disclosure of their personal information, though supporters acknowledge it shouldn't stand alone as a security measure.

  • Munger Tolles, Stroock Alums Tapped For Calif. Judiciary

    Among California Gov. Gavin Newsom's picks for judgeships around the Golden State are a former Munger Tolles & Olson LLP attorney, who will serve on the state's Second District Court of Appeal, and a Stroock & Stroock & Lavan LLP alumna.

  • Sen. Menendez Won't Delay May 6 Trial As He Forgoes Appeal

    Sen. Robert Menendez told a New York federal judge Thursday he won't seek interlocutory appeal of his order two weeks ago rejecting the lawmaker's bid to dismiss his bribery case based on the speech and debate clause of U.S. Constitution, teeing up his jury trial set for May 6.

  • Feds Say Ex-OneCoin Atty Should Serve 'Substantial' Time

    Manhattan federal prosecutors have requested a "substantial" amount of prison time for a Bulgarian woman who worked on the legal team at the fraudulent OneCoin cryptocurrency exchange, but said the sentence should fall below the guidelines range of 10 years.

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    What To Know About The Judge Mediating Alex Jones' Ch. 11

    After more than a year of squabbling in conspiracy theorist Alex Jones' high profile Chapter 11 case, a Texas bankruptcy judge appointed fellow jurist U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Edward Lee Morris to mediate the Infowars host's many disputes with creditors, and the mediator's lengthy tenure handling complex commercial insolvencies is likely to be fully brought to bear.

  • Spokeo Accused Of Flouting NJ Judicial Protection Law

    Spokeo Inc., the people search database provider, violated New Jersey state law by not removing information about law enforcement personnel from its database after requests were filed, a data privacy company contends in a lawsuit.

  • Ga. Slams Trump's Speech Claims As Bid To 'Rewrite' Case

    An effort by former President Donald Trump to have his Georgia election interference charges tossed on First Amendment grounds is little more than "an attempt to rewrite the indictment" away from the criminal conspiracy behind his false claims about the 2020 election, prosecutors told a Fulton County judge Thursday.

  • Pillsbury Ducks Malpractice Suit At 3rd Circ. Over Bankruptcy

    A Third Circuit panel on Thursday shot down a bid from a group of hotel investors to sue Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP for malpractice, finding a Delaware bankruptcy court was right in denying the request sought months after a Chapter 11 plan had been finalized.

  • Ohio Justices Split On Attorney's Sanction For Hiding His Past

    The Ohio Supreme Court has given a Cleveland attorney a six-month stayed suspension for omitting information in his application for a physician assistant license about multiple name changes and prior proceedings against him for having child pornography on his computer, which he had created via photo editing to demonstrate a point while serving as a defense expert.

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    Vaughan Baio Debuts ADR Team With Connell Foley Ex-Judge

    Vaughan Baio & Partners has hired a retired New Jersey Superior Court assignment judge with more than 30 years of experience to join as of counsel and launch its alternative dispute resolution practice in Cherry Hill, New Jersey.

  • Disbarring Jeffrey Clark Would Chill Gov't Dialogue, Prof Says

    A Yale Law School professor said Thursday that he does not believe former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark should face punishment for advocating to send a letter to Georgia officials purporting to identify significant concerns with the 2020 election, testifying before a Washington, D.C., attorney ethics panel that such discipline would devastate free dialogue within government agencies.

  • SC Can Use Challenged Elections Map Amid Justices' Review

    A federal judicial panel ruled Thursday that South Carolina can conduct its 2024 elections under a congressional map it found unconstitutionally discriminates against Black voters, and which the U.S. Supreme Court is reviewing, saying it's now too late in the election cycle to make changes to the map.

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    Former Prosecutors Among 4 Georgia Judicial Appointments

    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced on Wednesday that he had named a district attorney to serve as a superior court judge, a senior assistant district attorney to serve as a state court judge, and one judge each to the jury division and traffic division in DeKalb County.

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    Grading Garland: Attys Give AG Mixed Reviews 3 Years In

    U.S. Attorney General Merrick Garland's name won't be on the ticket in November, but his performance three years into his tenure is a subplot in the 2024 presidential election.

  • Another Senate Dem Comes Out Against 3rd Circ. Nominee

    A third Senate Democrat, Jacky Rosen of Nevada, has come out against Third Circuit nominee Adeel Mangi, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge if confirmed, thus putting his nomination in further peril.

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    Bankman-Fried Gets 25 Years For 'Very Bad Bet' Of FTX Fraud

    FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried was sentenced Thursday to 25 years in prison for stealing more than $11 billion from customers, investors and lenders of his now-collapsed cryptocurrency empire, with a Manhattan federal judge saying the infamous risk-taker "made a very bad bet about the likelihood of getting caught."

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    Judge Agrees To Training For 'Overly Harsh' Workplace

    The Judicial Council for the Second Circuit has declined to review the dismissal of a law clerk's complaint against a federal judge, who acknowledged the clerk's claims of their "overly harsh" management style and agreed to participate in workplace conduct counseling and training.

  • Calif. Judge Decries DOJ's Broken Promises In Travel Ban Suit

    A California federal judge reprimanded U.S. Department of Justice attorneys for causing delays, breaking promises and hobbling the administration of justice while granting class certification to individuals who sought waivers to former President Donald Trump's travel ban targeting mostly Muslim-majority countries.

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    Sotomayor 'Annoyed' By Supreme Court's Focus On History

    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor seemed to release some pent-up frustration Wednesday over the court's increasing focus on history and tradition when reviewing constitutional disputes, suggesting the method frequently used by the court's more conservative members isn't foolproof.

  • Eastman Should Be Disbarred, Calif. State Bar Judge Rules

    A State Bar Court of California judge on Wednesday recommended disbarring Donald Trump's onetime attorney John Eastman, who helped plan and promote the former president's strategy to overturn the 2020 presidential election.

  • Panel Wants NJ Judge Booted Off Bench For 'Blatant' Violations

    The New Jersey state courts' Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct recommended Wednesday that a municipal judge with posts in Burlington and Mercer counties be removed from the bench for "blatant and serious" violations of judicial conduct codes.

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Expert Analysis

  • Supporting Associates Amid Pandemic's Mental Health Toll Author Photo

    As junior associates increasingly report burnout, work-life conflict and loneliness during the pandemic, law firms should take tangible actions to reduce the stigma around seeking help, and to model desired well-being behaviors from the top down, say Stacey Whiteley at the New York State Bar Association and Robin Belleau at Kirkland.

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    Ask A Mentor: Should My Law Firm Take On An Apprentice? Author Photo

    Mentoring a law student who is preparing for the bar exam without attending law school is an arduous process that is not for everyone, but there are also several benefits for law firms hosting apprenticeship programs, says Jessica Jackson, the lawyer guiding Kim Kardashian West's legal education.

  • The Importance Of Client Engagement In Law Firm Innovation Author Photo

    As clients increasingly want law firms to serve as innovation platforms, firms must understand that there is no one-size-fits-all approach — the key is a nimble innovation function focused on listening and knowledge sharing, says Mark Brennan at Hogan Lovells.

  • The Unique Challenges Facing Women-Owned Law Firms Author Photo

    In addition to establishing their brand from scratch, women who start their own law firms must overcome inherent bias against female lawyers and convince prospective clients to put aside big-firm preferences, says Joel Stern at the National Association of Minority and Women Owned Law Firms.

  • The Pursuit Of Wellness In BigLaw: Lessons From My Journey Author Photo

    Jane Jeong at Cooley shares how grueling BigLaw schedules and her own perfectionism emotionally bankrupted her, and why attorneys struggling with burnout should consider making small changes to everyday habits.

  • Why We Must Recruit And Advance More Black Prosecutors Author Photo

    Black Americans make up a disproportionate percentage of the incarcerated population but are underrepresented among elected prosecutors, so the legal community — from law schools to prosecutor offices — must commit to addressing these disappointing demographics, says Erika Gilliam-Booker at the National Black Prosecutors Association.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Associates Deal With Overload? Author Photo

    Young lawyers overwhelmed with a crushing workload must tackle the problem on two fronts — learning how to say no, and understanding how to break down projects into manageable parts, says Jay Harrington at Harrington Communications.

  • A Scientific Path For Improving Diversity At Law Firms Author Photo

    Law firms could combine industrial organizational psychology and machine learning to study prospective hires' analytical thinking, stress response and similar attributes — which could lead to recruiting from a more diverse candidate pool, say Ali Shahidi and Bess Sully at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Associates Seek More Assignments? Author Photo

    In the first installment of Law360 Pulse's career advice guest column, Meela Gill at Weil offers insights on how associates can ask for meaningful work opportunities at their firms without sounding like they are begging. 

  • Legal Sector Regulatory Reform Is Key To Closing Justice Gap Author Photo

    In order to improve access to justice for those who cannot afford a lawyer, states should consider regulatory innovations, such as allowing new forms of law firm ownership and permitting nonlawyers to provide certain legal services, says Patricia Lee Refo, president of the American Bar Association.

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